How to enter the 2018 London Marathon

Last Sunday, like many others I spent several hours watching the London Marathon. Would Mary Keitany win the women’s race or would her fast start come back to haunt her? Could Charlie Purdue beat Alyson Dyson? London Marathon

If watching people pounding the streets of London inspired you, here’s my guide of how to apply for a place in next year’s London Marathon which will take place on Sunday April 22nd.

Public ballot. The most common way to apply for a place is through the public ballot. The public ballot system for the 2018 London Marathon opens on May 1st and closes at 17:00 on Friday May 5th. Whereas the ballot used to close once a certain number of people had entered, it’s now open for five days to give everyone who wants to enter a fair chance to do so.

Although arguably this system is fairer as accessing the ballot entry system used to be a bit of a nightmare, it has resulted in a massive increase in the number of applicants. More than 250,000 people entered last year for just over 50,000 places so the odds of getting a place aren’t great. The ballot is drawn completely at random and results are usually announced in October.

Although the odds of getting a place through the public ballot are pretty slim, you’ve got to be in it to win it! If you do enter the ballot then get training now, don’t leave it until the results are announced later in the year.

London 2015

Run for charity. If you fail to win a place in the public ballot then another option is to run for charity. The majority of major charities have a set number of places in the London Marathon each year through the London Marathon’s Golden and Silver Bond scheme. Each charity then allocates their places to runners on the basis that they will raise an agreed amount of money for the charity.

The London Marathon website has a list of charities with places here. Another really useful website is CRunCH – the Charity Runners Clearing House. CRunCH teams up people who want to run the London Marathon with charities that have guaranteed places to offer.

If you really want to run for charity, then I would strongly recommend that you start sending in your applications as early as possible i.e. now and definitely well before October when the results of the ballot are announced. Most charities ask runners to pledge to raise in excess of £1500 so the earlier you start your fundraising the better!

Be a fast runner! If you are a fast UK-based runner then applications for ‘Good for Age’ entries will open in June. There is loads of information on the London Marathon website here. As a 38 year old female, I would have to run a marathon in under 3 hours and 45 minutes.GFA

Although this is never going to happen, I’m just pleased I’m not a male runner as they have to run a sub 3:05 marathon! If you’re really, really speedy then you can apply for a Championship entry. Standards for Championship entry are currently:Championship Entry

If you qualify for either a ‘Good for Age’ or Championship entry then you are awesome, make sure that you enjoy the 2018 London Marathon!

British Athletics Club entry. One advantage of being an active member of an athletics club affiliated to British Athletics is what I call the annual London Marathon ballot entry rejects draw. Athletics clubs are able to apply for club entries into the London Marathon, with the number of entries given to each club based on the number of affiliated first claim adult members. Athletics clubs with between 1 and 99 members only receive 1 place whereas clubs with more than 300 members receive 4 places.

Although this allocation is not as generous as it used to be – I can remember the year my club actually struggled to find people who wanted to complete the marathon distance – this option still offers another entry route into the London Marathon. Each athletics club will have its own set of rules for entry into their ballot entry rejects draw but I can name dozens of runners who have got a coveted place in the London Marathon through their athletics club.

Enter Competitions. Although this isn’t a guaranteed route into the big event, I would recommend that all London Marathon wannabes find out the names of the major partners and sponsors of the 2018 event and stalk follow them on social media.

Sponsors

I was fortunate enough to win a place in the 2016 London Marathon through a competition on twitter, and I’ve already spotted a couple of competitions offering entry into the 2018 London Marathon. It’s definitely well worth keeping a close eye on social media.

Because I’m feeling generous, here’s a Virgin Money Giving competition I spotted on social media earlier.

Competition

Enter here.

Start a running blog. Although I haven’t been fortunate enough to receive an email offering me a media place in the London Marathon, a number of running bloggers have been provided with entries. While blogging definitely isn’t a guaranteed route into the London Marathon, you never know, one day your blog might catch the attention of an official partner or sponsor.

Become a celebrity. Please don’t!

Finally, please note that all of my waffle above only applies to UK-based runners. If you are an overseas based runner then please have a look here.

Good luck!!!

Rants and raves #12

**Disclaimer: Sadly, I no longer feel like a runner. Now that the weather has improved and the evenings have started to get lighter, I’ve realised just how much I miss running. As always, all rants, raves and opinions represent my own views. Other (far superior) less opinionated and negative running blogs are available**

I hope that everyone had a great Easter weekend. Although the weather was slightly rubbish in Sutton Coldfield, I still managed to fit in a couple of decent walks.

Unfortunately, I was informed that I’m too old for Easter eggs 😦

Rave: My right heel

Now I don’t want to curse myself *touches wood* but I think that my right heel is finally starting to get better. Hopefully all of the icing, stretching and resting is making a difference. I can’t wait to put on my running gear again, it’s been a while.

Ready to run

Walking is still quite challenging first thing in the morning, but there has been a definite improvement since I last blogged. I’m definitely at the ‘testing it out on a short run’ stage.

Rant: Job hunting

A couple of months ago I spotted an amazing job opportunity. I had all of the qualifications and experience required so decided to apply. I completed the most complicated online application form I’ve ever seen, and spent ages writing and re-writing answers to five technical competency questions. I submitted my application and started the waiting game.

A month after submitting my application I received the dreaded ‘I regret to inform you…’ email. I was gutted as while I knew there would be a lot of internal competition for the job, I honestly thought that my experience would have at least got me an interview. I asked for feedback on my application but was told they couldn’t provide feedback.

At least this organisation sent me a ‘thanks but no thanks’ email. The majority don’t seem to take the time to contact unsuccessful applicants.

Rave: Sweaty Betty zero gravity crop run leggings

Now although I’m definitely more High Street than posh boutique when it comes to buying running gear, when I spotted these Sweaty Betty leggings online it was love at first sight. Yes I am easily pleased and quite fickle. I also have a bum that needs sculpting.

Sweaty Betty

Fortunately, it’s my birthday soon, so I’ve dropped a few unsubtle hints – i.e. I’ve emailed my size and the link to the leggings – to my friend who just so happens to live a 5-minute walk from the Sweaty Betty on Marylebone High Street.

If you don’t ask, you don’t get…

Rant: Failing to complete Swimathon

Last year an elbow injury prevented me from swimming 1500m for Swimathon. This year a severe lack of self-confidence and an attack of the jitters prevented me from swimming 1500m. On the day of my Swimathon challenge, I arrived at the swimming pool, saw how busy the pool looked and how fast everyone else was swimming and completely bottled it. Not cool and definitely another failure.

Once the Easter holidays have finished, I’m determined to return to the pool to complete the 1500m distance. I won’t get a Swimathon medal but I will hopefully feel a sense of achievement.

Rave: Quirky running gifts

A totally unexpected parcel arrived address to me last week. When I opened the parcel a piece of athletics track on a key ring and a certificate of authenticity dropped out.

london-2012.jpg

Apologies for the slightly blurry photo! I’m now the proud owner of a piece of the London 2012 athletics track. In 2013 I got to run on the track, now I get to keep a piece of the track. As a running geek and athletics fan this makes me really happy.

I’ve no idea who bought me this rather quirky gift but thanks, I love it!

Once again, if you’ve reached the end of my latest random selection of rants, raves, moans and groans then I’m impressed.

Apologies for the bits and pieces blog, my next post will be slightly more interesting.

What is the most unusual running-related gift you’ve ever received? I think the London 2012 track keyring is pretty quirky.

Should I follow the C25K training plan when I start running again, or should I start with short distances and build from there? I suspect that I’ll find having zero fitness really frustrating, but I’m not sure I want to get stuck in a run-walk-run routine again.  

Rants and raves #11

**Disclaimer: this post was written while the author was experiencing heel pain and race envy. As always, all rants, raves and opinions represent my own views. Other (far superior) less opinionated and negative running blogs are available**

It’s been a while since I wrote my last Rants and raves post. Now that it’s April and I’m still injured, I feel the need to have a rant. As always I’ll start with rave.

Rave: Diet Coke

I think I’ve mentioned my slight Diet Coke addiction several times in my blog before. I recently realised my addiction was getting out of control when I looked inside my recycling bin and estimated that most of my recycling was Diet Coke cans. I would buy a multipack of Diet Coke – for some reason it had to be cans – and during an average day would easily drink 5-6 cans.

A few years ago I managed to stop drinking Diet Coke for six months; I can’t remember what made me break my Diet Coke ban, but I was soon drinking 5-6 cans a day. I decided to give up drinking Diet Coke and eating chocolate for Lent. The chocolate ‘ban’ lasted two days; when I see a bar of Dairy Milk I have zero willpower. I’m pleased to report I haven’t been near a can of Diet Coke since March 1st. I found breaking my Diet Coke drinking addiction so easy I suspect that it was more an obsession than a ‘proper’ addiction. It’s just a shame I’m now drinking a lot more tea.

Rant: My lack of self-control

I’m now going to contradict myself. While I found breaking my Diet Coke addiction quite straightforward, I wish the same could be said for my eating habits. Since I’ve been injured my eating habits have been poor. I’ve been treating myself to takeaways several times a week and eating far too much junk food. As a result I’ve gained a fair amount of weight since the start of the year. I’ve always had a slightly iffy relationship with food. I‘m an emotional eater and when I feel rubbish I seem to eat rubbish.BMIMost runners seem to lose weight, I’m the opposite. 

I know there are some limitations in using the body mass index (BMI) but I find it a useful guide. Although my BMI currently sits within the ‘healthy weight’ range, I’d like it to sit slightly nearer the middle of the range.

Rave: Tall ranges

There’s another slightly fickle reason I’d like to lose weight; summer.

I’ve never been a particularly girly girl; I blame my height and the lack of clothes for ‘tall’ women when I was growing up. As a teenager, I’d spend far too much time mooching about with my friends in Miss Selfridge, Topshop, C&A and New Look. While my friends had a great time trying on loads of clothes, I would spend my time wishing I was shorter as nothing ever fitted. My options were limited to Long Tall Sally and other expensive brands, so when I wasn’t wearing my school uniform or riding gear, I lived in jeans and checked shirts. The mid 90s were awesome…DP Tall dressesA selection of three of the summery dresses available in the Dorothy Perkins tall range.

Fast forward 20 or so years and more and more high street stores now have dedicated tall ranges. Although I’d rather have been looking at running gear, last night I spent ages looking at ‘tall’ summery dresses on Dorothy Perkins, Long Tall Sally, New Look, GAP and Next. I’ve finally accepted that I’m too old for Topshop. It was great as for the first time ever I actually felt slightly overwhelmed as there were so many dresses to choose from.

Rant: Plantar Fasciitis and DNS’ing races

I’m still injured and haven’t been for a run since Tuesday February 6th. The Cambridge Half Marathon, the Seven Pools Run and the City of Birmingham 10k have all been marked down in my running diary as ‘DNS’. While I’m sure I’ll be writing ‘DNS’ next to a few more races, my heel is gradually getting better and I’m confident I’ll be running again fairly soon.

Rant: Unworn running kit

Apologies for having two consecutive rants, but as this one is directly linked to my rant about my injury woes I thought I’d get away with it! Like virtually every runner I know I love shopping for new running kit. My injury means that the running kit I was bought for Christmas is as yet unworn, and in some cases is still waiting to be unwrapped.Christmas clothesThis is possibly the most upsetting photo I’ll ever share on my blog.

I’m just thankful something made me opt for a pre-Christmas shopping spree in Long Tall Sally rather than in Niketown. Perhaps subconsciously I knew I was about to pick up an injury.

Rave: The National Running Show

And finally, some positive news. The organisers of the National Running Show are currently recruiting Ambassadors. I applied and was accepted. I’m just waiting to receive a few more details, but it would be great to see some of you in Birmingham next January.

If you’ve reached the end of my latest random selection of rants, raves, moans and groans then I’m seriously impressed.

Huge apologies for another rather random blog, hopefully my next post will be slightly more positive.

Swimathon: I’m sinking rather than swimming

Last year, I was asked if I’d like to be a member of the 2017 Swimathon BlogSquad. After an elbow injury meant that I was unable to complete my personal Swimathon challenge last year, I was thrilled to be given the opportunity to redeem myself.

C21w1i9UsAAGDbJ

I dug out my swimming costume, dusted off my goggles, consulted the internet and wrote myself a training plan. I hadn’t been near a swimming pool for several months and the first training session was enjoyable but challenging. I’d lost all of my swimming endurance. Last year I’d made myself swim 1500m; fast forward six months and I found myself struggling to swim a length.

That’s correct. Even swimming 25m was difficult.

After three training sessions I could swim the not so grand total of four lengths or 100m. Feeling slightly despondent I researched adult swimming lessons. Unfortunately, the timing and cost meant that swimming lessons weren’t an option.

December was more or less a complete write-off. I was juggling two jobs and working seven days a week. My local pool always seemed to be open when I was work and closed when I was at home. For the first time I regretted accepting a place in the Swimathon BlogSquad, I felt that other bloggers would have been able to devote more time and resources to the challenge.

Not a natural swimmerTaken during the 2016 BlogSquad session – work prevented me from attending the session this year.

Once Christmas was over I had more time to dedicate to swimming. I treated myself to a new swimming cap and costume from Zoggs – new kit always motivates me – and allocated time in my diary for training sessions. By the middle of January I could swim for 15 lengths on a bad day and 20 lengths on a good day. The good days started to outnumber the bad days and my confidence in the water started to grow. All I had to do was swim another 40 lengths…

At the beginning of February I managed to swim 1000m. I took me a long time and I felt shattered, but for the first time I actually felt like a proper swimmer. A combination of the lurgy and a re-occurrence of my elbow niggle unfortunately meant that after that epic 1000m swim, I only swam four more times in February.

I started to panic and the self-doubt made an unwelcome reappearance.

March arrived and I realised that Swimathon 2017 was weeks rather than months away. I taped up my elbow and returned to the pool. My first training session back was quite stressful as I was acutely aware that I was far too slow for the slow lane. It’s easy to move out of the way of faster runners during a race, it’s not quite so easy to swim out of the way of faster swimmers. I completed 10 lengths and then relocated from the deep pool area to the shallow water area. When you’re nearly 6ft tall swimming in shallow water is difficult. I went home feeling quite deflated.

The following day I returned to the pool, ignored the other swimmers in the slow lane and made myself swim 1000m. My confidence increased and mid way through the month I swam 1250m. Only another 250m to go! Six days later I experienced what felt like a panic attack while I was swimming. I tried to stand up mid-length, discovered I couldn’t put my foot down and swallowed loads of water. It was a scary reminder of the day I got into difficulties in the same pool as a child. I had another panic attack the next time I attempted to swim. I felt fine for the first few lengths and then started to panic.

Just thinking about going swimming and writing this post is making me feel anxious. Stupid I know! The weekend of Swimathon 2017 is now rapidly approaching and I don’t think I’ll be able to complete my personal challenge.

Does anyone have any tips for overcoming swim-related anxiety? I don’t want to let the organisers of Swimathon and the BlogSquad down a second time.

Mental tips and strategies for marathon runners

Dr Carla Meijen, Lecturer in Sport Psychology at the University of Kent, has introduced the first psyching team – a team who offer help and support with practical mental strategies before, during and after long distance running events, to the UK.  As a number of spring marathons are fast approaching, I decided to share some of the mental tips and strategies for runners developed by Dr Meijen and her colleagues.

By following the advice of Dr Meijen and her colleagues, runners can use simple techniques to prepare for mental demands such as worries about coping with the pain and discomfort of running a marathon, or about sticking to their race plan. These techniques are split into mental strategies for before the day of the marathon, during the marathon itself and after the marathon.

Before the day of the marathon:

  • Have multiple goals and try not to rely on just one time-based goal. Many runners have a time-based goal in mind; it can be helpful to expand on this and have some flexibility in your goals. One approach is to set different levels of goals, for example setting a dream goal, for when race day conditions are perfect. Next, set a goal you would still be happy with when conditions are less than perfect. I did this before the Great Birmingham Run. Finally, identify a goal that would be the bare minimum if things don’t go to plan. Having three different goals can help you avoid disappointment during the marathon if your dream goal is hard to achieve on the day of the race.
  • Break the race down. Consider splitting the race into different parts. The marathon distance can seem daunting and those 26.2 miles can seem a long way away. Dr Meijen recommends thinking about the marathon as having three different parts and having goals for each part. You can consider using the first 8-10 miles to take in the atmosphere and to get comfortable with your pace. The next 8-10 miles are about trying to intensify the effort. During the final 6 miles you should be totally focused, monitor how you are feeling and if things are going to plan go for a full-out effort to the finish.

Just a parkrun to go[Source]

  • Prepare in order to reduce worries on the day. One of my favourite quotes is “By failing to prepare, you are preparing to fail”, this is true for the marathon. As a first-time marathon runner you may feel concerned about what to expect on the day of the race with so many other runners around. There will always be factors out of your control – for example the mini heat wave during the 2007 London Marathon – but you can prepare for those you can control. Do the necessary preparation beforehand and study the course. How will you get to the start? Where are the water stations? Where are the portaloos? Make a check list to make sure you’ve got everything you need. It’s also important to practice your pre-race and race day fuelling strategies on a longer training run before the marathon.

During the marathon:

  • Run your own race. After three marathons I’m yet to run my own race, the atmosphere at large marathons is inspiring, almost too inspiring! It’s easy to get carried away at large events with the crowds cheering; with so many other runners there is a risk of starting at a much faster pace than normal and being worn out early on. Focus on your own race – at larger events there will be different pace groups – follow the one that is closest to your personal time-based goal.

London Marathon[Source]

  • Recall successful training runs. You should trust your training and if you are struggling during the race, recall all your successful training runs to remember your own ability. Use these positive experiences to give confidence that it can be done. You can recall what helped you through those challenging longer training runs; it may have been an inspiring song or the reason you have for actually running the marathon.
  • Have a mantra. Having a mantra can be really helpful, so choose one that worked for you during your training runs and use that during the race. Some runners write their mantra on their hand as a reminder. Unfortunately, my personal running mantra isn’t publishable, sorry.
  • Focus. Inevitably there will be a time during the marathon when your body starts to feel tired and sore. You might find it helpful to distract yourself when this happens by focusing on the sights or by replaying a song in your mind. Some runners prefer to focus on how their body feels and use breathing as a strategy to remain focused. Marathon world record holder Paula Radcliffe used to count to 100 three times in her head and knew that was roughly a mile.  Use whichever approach feels most comfortable for you.

After the marathon:

  • Reward yourself. After the marathon you may experience some post-marathon blues. Ideally, there should be a reward for your achievement – in my case a huge Mc Donald’s immediately after the last year’s London Marathon. You should also take time to reflect on what you’ve achieved.  I was so disappointed with my performance I didn’t do this and regretted it afterwards.

dscf1283

  • Start planning for next time. Finally, it’s back to planning and thinking about setting a new goal to work towards. Your new goal might to run another marathon or something totally different.

I really hope you found this post interesting. If you’re running a spring marathon then good luck! I’m more than a little bit jealous.

Do you have a running mantra? I quite like Paula Radcliffe’s ‘no limits’ mantra.

How do you keep going when the going gets tough? I’m rubbish and tend to walk as soon as I start to struggle.

Decathlon Sports Series 2017 running events

Regular readers of this blog will be aware that I’m not a huge fan of expensive races. £25 for a 5.5k fun run? No thanks. Over £250 for a marathon? I’d need to start saving and find myself a better job…

Fortunately, not all races are expensive, an increasing number of races are now free to enter. As my 15 tips for running and racing on a budget blog has rapidly become one of my most read posts, I’ve decided to share some information on a series of free to enter running events organised by Decathlon.

Following on from last year’s success, the Decathlon Sports Series is returning this month. This year it’s set to be even bigger and better featuring several sports including running, cycling, horse riding and hiking. I can’t wait to get involved.

top-banner-runing-series

The Decathlon Sports Series will be staging a series of 5k (and one 10k) running events across the UK. I’ve summarised the dates and locations below:

  • 26th March – Stevenage
  • 1st April – Oxford
  • 2nd April – Reading
  • 9th April – Farnborough
  • 7th May – Southampton
  • 13th May – Glasgow Braehead
  • 14th May – Edinburgh
  • 4th June – Harlow
  • 10th June – Warrington
  • 11th June – Stockport
  • 17th June – Tamworth
  • 2nd July – Poole Redlands
  • 9th July – Huyton
  • 9th August – Bolton
  • 13th August – Wandsworth
  • 19th August – Croydon
  • 20th August – Surrey Quays
  • 3rd September – Sheffield
  • 10th September – Nottingham Giltbrook
  • 1st October – Newcastle Gateshead
  • 7th October – Wednesbury
  • 5th November – Belfast 10k*

*For the 10k event in Belfast participants must be aged 15 and over. For more detailed information on each event please visit the dedicated running event page.

Although participants should be able to complete the route without assistance, marshals will be available to maintain the safety of all participants at all times. Updates will be released regularly in the lead up to each event. Race numbers will be distributed to your selected store, and will be available to collect prior to the event, or on the day of the race.

Decathlon Gateshead 2016

[Source]

All entrants will receive a free t-shirt to run in on the day, and as an added bonus each participant will receive a Sports Series goody bag and medal at the end of the race. Very impressive for a free event!

These events are free and exclusive for Decathlon Card holders. If you are not a Decathlon Card Member you need to sign up here.

Places are limited to a maximum of 500 participants per race so don’t forget to sign up!

I’m hoping that my right heel will recover in time for me to participate in my local event in Tamworth.

My Top 10 Websites for Runners

Recently, I’ve spent far, far too much time researching Plantar Fasciitis on the internet. My nickname could be Professor Plantar. The amount of information about injury rehabilitation is mind-blowing, and in a lot of cases of slightly dubious quality. As I’m sure that I’m not the only runner who spends quite a lot of time perusing the internet, I decided to share my top 10 websites for runners.

So here are my top 10 websites for runners:

1. Fetch Everyone If you want to write a blog, find an obscure local race, get advice from runners, enter competitions and monitor your progress (or lack of progress) as a runner, then visit Fetch Everyone. I’ve been a member since 2005 and have made some great friends through the site.

Awesome features and articles include:

2. Runner’s World Although the recent improvements to the site haven’t been popular, Runner’s World remains one of my favourite running sites. If you need advice and support you’ll find it on the forums. If you need to find a 10K race in April search the extensive race listings. The wide range of articles written by experts and occasional competitions are an added bonus.

Recent articles have included:

3. The Running Bug The running site that I have a bit of an ongoing love hate relationship with. I love the useful articles, competitions and forums. I don’t love my online stalker and the fact that I’ve never, ever won a Running Bug competition. Hopefully 2017 will be my lucky year!

Recent articles have included:

4. Strava Strava allows runners and cyclists to track and analyse their training, measure their performance against other athletes, share their training on social media and much more. I’m too tight to pay for a premium membership, so I’m aware that I’m missing out on most of the awesomeness of Strava. When I find myself a ‘proper’ job and can run I’ll be upgrading my account. On a side note, if you want to read about ‘runners’ setting CRs on bikes,  the twitter account @stravawankers is well worth following.

5. Running Heroes Back in October, the Running Heroes website featured as a ‘rave’ in one of my Rants and raves posts. Such an honour! Running Heroes works with organisations and brands to encourage and reward runners. The site is really easy to use and I’ve collated a lot of points and completed 30 challenges. While I’ve never been selected as a random prize winner, I remain quietly optimistic.

The site also allows runners to exchange their points for a wide range of rewards. I can’t wait for my running clothes ‘ban’ to come to an end so that I can exchange some of my points.

Running Heroes

6. GB Mapometer Although strictly speaking GB Mapometer isn’t a running site, it is a useful resource for runners. I used the site to plot all of my longer runs when I was training for the Great Birmingham Run. The site allows users to accurately plot and measure routes, and provides an indication of the elevation of each route. Useful for avoiding hills in the final few miles of a long training run.

7. parkrun An essential resource for all parkrunners. Although the site can be quite slow during the weekend when a bazillion runners are searching for their latest parkrun result, if you are a new runner and want to take part in your local parkrun, you need to visit the site to register. The site contains an interactive map which illustrates every parkrun event in the UK and links to the individual parkrun event pages, a blog, information on sponsors, results, some information on the parkrun team and a link to the parkrun shop.

parkrun

8. NHS Couch to 5K If I had to recommend one running website to people just starting out as a runner, it would be the NHS Couch to 5K site. The site is free and contains a wealth of information for both beginner and slightly more experienced runners. There are links to download the Couch to 5K app, weekly Couch to 5K podcasts, a simple to use race finder and the dedicated Couch to 5K forums. Finally, the series of guides for runners are a useful invaluable resource.

The most popular articles include:

9. Made with Sisu I’ve been using Made with Sisu to generate data visualisations based on my training runs for quite some time. I almost ordered a print of my 2016 training runs but held back when I realised it would probably end up sitting in a corner somewhere gathering dust. I reckon that this site is probably a must for runners attempting to complete the six World Marathon Major events, the example Tokyo Marathon print looks pretty awesome.

10. The Running Blog – The Guardian The final site to make it into my ‘Top 10’ is the Guardian’s Running Blog. Described as a blog on “…all things running, from jogs around the park to ultra marathons”, there is definitely something for runners of all standards and distances. I love the ‘How was your weekend running?’ and the ‘Friday flyer’ series; some of the comments left by runners and jealous non-runners are highly entertaining.

Recent articles have included:

Hopefully some of the websites and running resources I’ve summarised will be useful to some of you. I also hope that my rambling hasn’t bored you all to tears.

What are your favourite running websites? Did I miss out any really awesome sites?

Which website do you use to search for race listings? I’ve always tended to use Runner’s World find the new and improved site quite hard to use.