Does Bigger Mean Better?

Recently, I’ve spent many hours staring at my computer screen willing my PhD thesis to write itself. While I’m checking for typos (luckily I noticed that I’d written testes instead of tested) I tend to leave my Hotmail account running in the background. In my humble opinion, emails are generally far more entertaining than typo checking.

Some of the emails I’m receiving are starting to get irritating. Why do some events feel the need to send so many emails? One email urging to me sign up for the London Duathlon is enough. I’ve now lost count of the number of emails I’ve received from the event organisers. I didn’t take part in the event this year so how did they get my email address?

Another gripe. Since when did it become essential to sign up for popular events almost a year in advance? I have no idea what I’ll be doing this time next month. Having to enter the more popular events almost 12 months in advance seems slightly excessive.

*deletes London Duathlon emails*

Unfortunately, the London Duathlon organisers aren’t the only culprits, Sweatshop also seem to be sending out increasing numbers of emails.

*deletes Sweatshop emails and hits the unsubscribe option, again*

emails

Straight into the Junk folder.

Earlier today I worked out how many events I’ve missed so far this year due to injury. The list is pretty (un)impressive and includes the London Marathon, the Bupa London 10,000, the National Lottery Newham London Anniversary Run, Bud’s Run, the Red Bull Steeplechase and a few others I’ve forgotten.  I really don’t want to work out how much money I’ve wasted on entry fees.

Only one event; the Red Bull Steeplechase, refunded my entry fees. Full marks to Red Bull!

I know it isn’t the organisers’ fault that I couldn’t run due to injury, but having to enter events months in advance doesn’t help. Surely some of the bigger events have enough staff to be able to organise the transfer of race numbers between runners? This would prevent the “illegal” swapping of numbers and would enable more runners to take part in events. I love win-win solutions!

I’ve now reached the conclusion that when it comes to running events, bigger does not always mean better. In 2015 I’ll enter more local events that I can actually enter on the day. By supporting smaller, local events I’ll save money on unused entry fees.

Bupa

Sorry Hugh, I won’t be on the start line.

So in my opinion, bigger doesn’t always mean better.

In my next ranty blog installment I’ll be discussing the pros and cons of online first-come-first served vs. ballot entry systems.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s