Race Report: Lichfield 10k

Thanks to my slightly temperamental head, I have to limit the amount of time I spend on my computer.  As I might not complete another race this year I decided to finish my somewhat belated review of the Lichfield 10k. Apologies if there are even more typos than normal. I’m having to type in a hurry.

I spent the evening before the race obsessively checking a selection of weather forecasts. Last year it was really warm and I made the mistake of not respecting the weather. Fortunately, this year the forecast was for cool and potentially wet conditions. As I knew that the majority of the course would be reasonably sheltered, I decided to ignore the wind.Lichfield weatherI woke early on the morning of the race and spent what felt like ages searching for four safety pins and attempting to pin my number to my t-shirt. As the race didn’t start until 10:30 I made myself eat two bowls of weetabix and a banana. I was reminded that I hate the feeling of ‘having’ to eat. I had a successful loo visit, a shower and got changed into my running gear, grabbed a bottle of energy drink and walked the short distance to the train station. So far so good.

A year ago, I got talking to a lovely lady called Ellen at the train station. This year, I bumped into Ellen and her family again. I quickly discovered that Ellen had been completely bitten by the running bug and was hoping to beat her 10k PB. I love it when people fall in love with running.

We walked the short distance from Lichfield City station to Race HQ and discovered we had enough time to collect our race t-shirts while the queues were reasonably short. I left my bag in the secure baggage area and went to find portaloos. The queue was massive and I estimate it took me 15-20 minutes to reach the front of the queue. Rather worryingly, one of the portaloos had been padlocked shut. I dread to think what had happened inside; luckily the portaloo I used was clean and pong-free.

Pre race faffingFeeling a lot lighter, I headed to the start area, positioned myself near the back of the crowd of runners and spotted Ellen. As we wanted similar times we decided to run together, and positioned ourselves a few metres behind the 65 minute pacer. We observed a minute’s applause for Bob Houghton, the starter sounded and we waited to start.

Although we had started near the back of the field, the first half mile or so mile was incredibly congested in places. The road surface was also incredibly uneven and I somehow managed to twist my temperamental right knee. Not the best start. The 65 minute pacer disappeared off into the distance and it seemed to take us a long time to get near her again. We made the most of the numerous downhill sections and maintained a sensible pace up the short inclines. Once I’d woken and warmed-up I found the first mile relatively easy and was quite impressed with myself for setting out at a sensible pace.

The second mile was a little more challenging. Once we’d finally escaped the main road and the rather irate drivers stuck in traffic in the opposite direction *toot toot*, we turned towards Whittington – an area of countryside that is going to be severely impacted by HS2. Last year I’d set out at such a ridiculously fast pace I was struggling after two miles. Fast forward twelve months and although I’d set out a much slower pace, I was still finding maintaining any sort of pace incredibly difficult.

When we reached the third mile – the start of Darnford Lane – I knew that one of the most challenging sections of the course was approaching and started to prepare myself mentally. I was aware I was working hard and the running related chat stopped temporarily. Last year, I walked most of this section of the course. This year I was determined to run up the most demanding part of the course without stopping. I completed mile three in 10:30, a definite improvement on last year!

Untitled6Mile four was a bit of a blur. We reached the water station and although Ellen was sensible and grabbed a bottle of water, for some reason I decided to carry on without taking on any water. We left the drinks station behind and started to approach the location of my mini-meltdown last year; the bridge over the A38. Although I managed to run over the bridge without slowing to a walk, by the time we reached the housing estate I was struggling and walked for five minutes in an attempt to stretch out my right knee and get my breathing under control. Sorry Ellen!

The fifth mile was challenging both mentally and physically. After I slowed to a walk the second time, I persuaded Ellen to carry on without me. I didn’t want to ruin both of our races and I was acutely aware that I tweaked my right knee. Ellen went on to smash her 10k PB so it was definitely the correct decision. I resorted to a slightly feeble run-walk-stretch-run routine until my knee started to feel a little better. The fifth mile was shockingly slow.

Official photos

The final mile and a bit was pretty uneventful and I hobbled the uphill sections and power walked the downhill sections. Thanks knee! I remember waving at the official on course photographer – why do photographers insist on taking photos near the end when I look terrible? – and running slowly back towards the start. Rather embarrassingly I to stop at the bottom of the approach to the final 100m to stretch out my right knee. Knee sort of sorted, I ‘powered’ my way up the grassy hill to the finish, stumbled over the finish line, collected my medal and a bottle of water and remembered to keep on moving.

Post run pose

The finish area was slightly chaotic and I couldn’t see Ellen so I decided to retrieve my bag and dry clothes from the baggage drop. Bag collected, I headed back out into the cold and more by luck than judgement found Ellen and her family. I got Ellen to take a photo of me with my medal – I’ve no idea why I decided to stand at such a quirky angle –we arranged to meet up for some training runs and then went our separate ways.

By the time I got on the train I realised that I was feeling really cold. So cold my lips had started to turn a lovely shade of blue.

Post Lichfield selfie

Although I was initially incredibly disappointed in my race, the back of the race t-shirt helped to put everything into perspective.

T shirt and medal

I’m not sure I’ll enter the Lichfield 10k again next year. Writing this review has made me realise that I don’t actually enjoy running along uneven road surfaces, over dual carriageways and through housing estates. I suspect I’m letting my own poor performance cloud my judgement.

Lichfield strava

I can’t fault the organisation in the lead up to the race, on the day of the race and after the race. I received my results by text the second I crossed the finish line and the official race photographs were available to purchase the morning after the race.

Finally, if you are reading this race report in 2018, please don’t let my negativity stop you entering the race!

Race Ratings:

  • Cost: 7/10 – £17 + £2 service fee as an unaffiliated runner
  • Course: 5/10 – challenging and not very scenic
  • Medal: 8/10
  • Race t-shirt: 10/10
  • Goody Bag: N/A

 

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6 thoughts on “Race Report: Lichfield 10k

    • Emma says:

      Thanks. If I’m in one piece after the half marathon, I’m going to enter the Cinder Path 10k in Sutton Park the following Sunday. If I don’t enjoy the scenery in Sutton Park then I’m not going to enjoy running anywhere. The finisher t-shirt is lovely and actually fits.

      Like

    • Emma says:

      I almost think the quote is wasted on the back of the shirt. It should be on the front. I love the colour although a few runners were complaining because it’s not bright yellow (like last year’s shirt). My head has been a little better this week thanks.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Emma says:

      Fortunately, all the rest days I’ve been taking means my knee is *touch wood* more or less completely back to normal. I’m going to enter a 10k I haven’t run before so that I can stop comparing my times from last year and can move on from Lichfield. I agree, 10ks are pretty awful. I’ve no idea why I keep wanting to enter them.

      Like

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